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Analytical Methods for Dietary Supplements

Table of Contents

Analytical Methods Program Description
Published: ODS-Supported Developed Methods (not yet validated)
Lists of methods developed with ODS support and related publications for dietary supplement ingredients.
Methods (alphabetical by source)
Publications (alphabetical by author)
Published: ODS-Supported Validated Methods
Lists of methods validated with ODS support, and related publications for single-laboratory and collaborative study validations of analytical methods for dietary supplement ingredients and contaminants.
Single-Laboratory Validated Methods
Methods (alphabetical by analyte and source)
Publications (alphabetical by author)
Collaborative Study Validated Methods
Methods (alphabetical by analyte and source)
Publications (alphabetical by author)
In Progress: ODS-Supported Methods Development, Optimization, Validation
A list of dietary supplement ingredients for which ODS-supported development, optimization, and/or validation of analytical methods are currently in progress.
Search AOAC International® Official Methods of AnalysisSMexternal link icon for Additional Methods
FDA-NIH/ODS awarded a contract to AOAC International to find and validate methods for dietary supplement ingredients. AOAC International is a not-for-profit voluntary consensus standards body cited in the US Code of Federal Regulations under Title 21: "It is the policy of FDA in its enforcement program to use methods of analysis of AOAC International when available and applicable." AOAC International is cited under Title 9 within this context by the USDA. It is also internationally recognized by Codex Alimentarius, the International Organization for Standardization, and the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry and has been the leader in analytical methods validation for 120 years. AOAC International maintains no laboratories, conducts no research, and performs no tests. AOAC coordinates scientific studies, receives and evaluates the results, gives official sanction to acceptable methods, and publishes and distributes the methods and performance data.

Analytical Methods Program Description

The Analytical Methods Program is the largest component of ODS's Dietary Supplements Analytical Methods and Reference Materials (AMRM) Program. A large community of academics, regulators, manufacturers, laboratories, and trade associations is interested in developing and validating analytical methods for dietary supplements.

Program Need: Very few publicly available and reliable analytical methods for dietary supplements exist. This makes it difficult to confirm ingredient identity or product composition and to conduct adequate clinical studies assessing safety and efficacy. Furthermore, the Dietary Supplement Health Education Actexternal link icon empowered FDA to establish current good manufacturing practices for dietary supplements. The law requires that any enforcement action taken against dietary supplement products use publicly available methods.

Goal: The goal of this AMRM program component is to develop and validate methods that identify and quantify ingredients (bioactive and other chemical markers, adulterants, or contaminants) in dietary supplements.

Description: To achieve this goal, ODS collaborates with FDA, NIST, USDA, AOAC International, and other organizations.

Under the auspices of the AMRM program, ODS and FDA have supported AOAC Internationalexternal link icon in developing an infrastructure to support methods validation. AOAC International is a not-for-profit voluntary consensus standards body cited in the US Code of Federal Regulations and recognized by international regulatory and scientific institutions.

AOAC International maintains a committee structure to find and validate methods for dietary supplement ingredients. Criteria for prioritizing the need for methods are based on stability of market share, availability of reference materials and suitable methods, scientific and regulatory need, and industry interest. Urgent public health needs, e.g., the safety of ephedra, drive prioritization. Following prioritization, available methods are subjected to a peer-review process by committees composed of experts from industry, academia, and government. The committees select the most promising methods for further development, optimization, and validation. ODS supports their development and validation through a variety of funding mechanisms. AOAC International evaluates the validation study results and publishes the methods in the Journal of AOAC International. It also gives official sanction to acceptable methods if they meet AOAC's standards; they then become AOAC Official Methods of AnalysisSM (OMA).

ODS also supports FDA and USDA in methods development and optimization. FDA has been developing methods for detecting and quantifying contaminants (e.g., mycotoxins, toxic elements, and pesticides) found in source material and finished products. USDA is working on methods for quantifying phenolic glycosides and is evaluating methods for determining the authenticity of botanicals by principal component analysis. NIST may also develop and validate methods in its process of certifying values in NIST Standard Reference Materials® (SRM) and calibration standards. ODS provides support for the development of SRMs.

Validated Methods Defined: A validated method is a method that has been systematically evaluated for reliability and accuracy. Methods can be validated in single laboratory or multiple laboratories.

Types of Validation: A method that is intended to be performed in only one laboratory can be validated within that laboratory. This would be a single-laboratory validation (SLV). However, the results of a SLV method can not necessarily be compared to results obtained using a different method or the same SLV method in a different laboratory. The SLV method can be considered the first step toward a full official method validation. The SLV method debugs the method before it is subjected to a collaborative study.

The collaborative study is the gold standard. Multiple laboratories perform the same test on the same samples. If results from most of the laboratories are the same, the collaborative study is successful. A successful collaborative study leads to listing the method as an OMA.

To date, the ODS AMRM Program has supported SLV studies that lead to collaborative studies. Early in the AMRM program emphasis was placed on creation of OMA. In the future, ODS will place more emphasis on SLV studies. ODS stakeholders will determine whether an OMA is needed.

Availability of Validated Methods: The ODS Web site lists the ingredients for which validated methods are published. Their citations are referenced and ingredients for which validation testing is ongoing are also listed. Only ingredients with ODS-supported methods validation are listed. ODS AMRM Program stimulated the field of methods validation for dietary supplements, and many more validated methods now exist. These methods can be identified by searching the AOAC International Web site for methods published in the Journal of AOAC Internationalexternal link icon or OMAexternal link icon.

How to Become Involved: The AOAC International provides training materials for and courses on designing and conducting validation studies. It also requests nominations of dietary supplement ingredients for consideration of methods validation. AOAC International's website has further information about these opportunitiesexternal link icon. When funding opportunity announcements for methods development are available, ODS posts them on the AMRM Program Website.

Published: ODS-Supported Developed Methods (not validated)

Section Contents

Methods (alphabetical by source)

  • Black cohosh (Actaea racemosa L. syn. Cimicifuga racemosa (L.))
    • Actaea racemosa adulteration by TLC and combined TLC-BL [Ref 8]
    • Rapid HPTLC for detection of adulteration of black cohosh [Ref 1]
  • Botanicals (green tea leaf, ginseng root, eleuthero root, echinacea root, black cohosh rhizome, licorice root, kava root, milk thistle aerial parts, feverfew aerial parts, and ginger root)
    • HPTLC for identification of botanicals [Ref 5] [Ref 7]
    • Rapid HPTLC for detection of adulteration of black cohosh [Ref 1]
    • HPLC/MS to discriminate between green tea dietary supplements and green tea leaves [Ref 6]
  • Glycosides
    • Glycosides from valerian [Ref 4]
  • Pesticides
    • Multiresidue pesticides in ginseng root powders [Ref 9, 10]
  • Valerian (Valeriana)
    • Authentication of five species [Ref 1]
    • Chemical fingerprinting with LC UV: valerenic acids, flavonoids, and phenylpropanoids [Ref 3]
    • Glycosides from valerian [Ref 4]

Publications (alphabetical by author)

  1. Ankli A, Reich E, Steiner M. Rapid high-performance thin-layer chromatographic method of detection of 5% adulteration of black cohosh with Cimicifuga foetida, C. heracleifolia, C. dahurica, or C. Americana. J AOAC Int. 2008 Nov-Dec;91(6);1257-1264. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon]
  2. Joshi VC, Navarrete A, Khan IA. Authentication of Valeriana procera Kunth and comparative account of five Valeriana species. J AOAC Int. 2005 Nov-Dec;88(6):1621-5. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon]
  3. Navarrete A, Avula B, Choi YW, Khan IA. Chemical fingerprinting of Valeriana species: simultaneous determination of valerenic acids, flavonoids, and phenylpropanoids using liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. J AOAC Int. 2006 Jan-Feb;89(1):8-15. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon]
  4. Pullela SV, Choi YW, Khan SI, Khan IA. New acylated clionasterol glycosides from Valeriana officinalis. Planta Med. 2005 Oct;71(10):960-1. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon]
  5. Reich E, Schibli A, DeBatt A. Validation of high-performance thin-layer chromatographic methods for the identification of botanicals in a cGMP environment. J AOAC Int. 2008 Jan-Feb;91(1):13-20. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon] (Free full-text article available)
  6. Sun J, Chen P, Lin L-Z, Harnly JM. A non-targeted approach to chemical discrimination between green tea dietary supplements and green tea leaves by HPLC/MC. J AOAC Int. 2011 Mar-Apr;94(2):487-97.
  7. Supplemental information to Reference #4 above. Validation method for identification of green tea by HPTLC fingerprint. Supplemental information is for information only. It has not been reviewed through the AOAC peer-review process.
  8. Verbitski SM, Gourdin GT, Ikenouye LM, et al. Detection of Actaea racemosa adulteration by thin-layer chromatography and combined thin-layer chromatography-bioluminescence. J AOAC Int. 2008 Mar-Apr;91(2):268-75. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon]
  9. Wong JW, Hao C, Zhang K, et al. Development and interlaboratory validation of a QuEChERS-based liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for multiresidue pesticide analysis. J Agric Food Chem. 2010 May 26;58(10):5897-5903. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon]
  10. Wong JW, Zhang K, Tech K, et al. Multiresidue pesticide analysis of ginseng powders using acetonitrile- or acetone-based extraction, solid-phase extraction cleanup, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/selective ion monitoring (GC-MS/SIM) or -tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). J Agric Food Chem. 2010 May 26;58(10):5884-5896. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon]

Published: ODS-Supported Validated Methods

Section Contents

  • Single-Laboratory Validation (SLV)
  • Collaborative Study Validation

SLV Methods (alphabetical by analyte and source)

  • Alkaloids
    • Aconitum alkaloids in supplements and raw materials [Ref 9]
    • Ephedra alkaloids by LC/MSMS [Ref 8]
    • Synephrine in bitter orange by LC UV [Ref 5]
  • Aristolochic Acid
    • Aristolochic acid in botanicals and supplements by LC/MS [Ref 11]
  • Bitter orange (Citrus aurantium)
    • Synephrine in bitter orange by LC UV [Ref 5]
  • Carotenoids
    • β-Carotene in supplements and raw materials by LC [Ref 6]
  • Chondroitin sulfate
    • Chondroitin sulfate in raw materials and supplements [Ref 3]
  • Coenzyme Q10
    • Ubidecarenone (coenzyme Q10, ubiquinol-10) in raw materials and supplements [Ref 4]
  • Ephedra (Ephedra sinica)
    • Ephedra alkaloids by LC/MSMS [Ref 8]
  • Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba)
    • Flavonol aglycones in Ginkgo biloba in crude materials and finished products by HPLC Ref 2
    • Terpene lactones in Ginkgo biloba by HPLC [Ref 1]
  • Glucosamine
    • Glucosamine in raw materials and supplements by HPLC [Ref 13]
  • Mycotoxins
    • Aflatoxins and ochratoxin A in ginseng and other botanical roots [Ref 10]
    • Aflatoxins in botanical roots (black cohosh, echinacea, ginger, ginseng, kava kava, valerian) [Ref 12]
  • Phytosterols
    • Campesterol, stigmasterol, and β-sitosterol in saw palmetto raw materials and supplements by GC [Ref 7]
  • Saw palmetto (Serenoa repens)
    • Campesterol, stigmasterol, and β-sitosterol in saw palmetto raw materials and supplements by GC [Ref 7]
  • Terpenoids
    • Terpene lactones in Ginkgo biloba by HPLC [Ref 1]

SLV Publications (alphabetical by author)

  1. Croom E, Pace R, Paletti A, et al. Single-laboratory validation for the determination of terpene lactones in Ginkgo biloba dietary supplement crude materials and finished products by high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light-scattering detection. J AOAC Int. 2007 May-Jun;90(3):647-58. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon]
  2. Gray D, LeVanseler K, Pan M. Determination of flavonol aglycones in Ginkgo biloba dietary supplement crude materials and finished products by high-performance liquid chromatography: single laboratory validation. J AOAC Int. 2005 May-Jun;88(3):692-702. Erratum in: J AOAC Int. 2006 Mar-Apr;89(2):41A. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon] (Free full-text article available)
  3. Ji D, Roman M, Zhou J, Hildreth J. Determination of chondroitin sulfate content in raw materials and dietary supplements by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection after enzymatic hydrolysis: single-laboratory validation. J AOAC 2007 May-Jun;90(3):659-669. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon] (Free full-text article available)
  4. Orozco D, Skamarack J, Reins K, et al. Determination of ubidecarenone (coenzyme Q10, ubiquinol-10) in raw materials and dietary supplements by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection: single-laboratory validation. J AOAC Int. 2007 Sep-Oct;90(5):1227-1236. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon] (Free full-text article available)
  5. Roman MC, Betz JM, Hildreth J. Determination of synephrine in bitter orange raw materials, extracts, and dietary supplements by liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection: single-laboratory validation. J AOAC Int. 2007 Jan-Feb;90(1):68-81. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon]
  6. Schierle J, Pietsch B, Ceresa A, et al. Method for the determination of β-carotene in supplements and raw materials by reversed-phase liquid chromatography: single laboratory validation. J AOAC Int. 2004 Sep-Oct;87(5):1070-1082. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon] (Free full-text article available)
  7. Sorenson W, Sullivan D. Determination of campesterol, stigmasterol, and beta-sitosterol in saw palmetto raw materials and dietary supplements by gas chromatography: single-laboratory validation. J AOAC Int. 2006 Jan-Feb;89(1):22-34. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon] (Free full-text article available)
  8. Sullivan D, Wehrmann J, Schmitz J, et al. Determination of ephedra alkaloids by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. J AOAC Int. 2003 May-Jun;86(3):471-475. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon] (Free full-text article available)
  9. Tang WT, Wong SK, Law TY, et al. Method for the determination of aconitum alkaloids in dietary supplements and raw materials by reversed-phase liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection and confirmation by tandem mass spectrometry: single-laboratory validation. J AOAC Int. 2006 Nov-Dec;89(6):1496-1514. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon] (Free full-text article available)
  10. Trucksess M, Weaver C, Oles C, et al. Determination of aflatoxins and ochratoxin A in ginseng and other botanical roots by immunoaffinity column cleanup and liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. J AOAC Int. 2006 May-Jun;89(3):624-630. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon] (Free full-text article available)
  11. Trujillo WA, Sorenson WR, La Luzerne P, et al. Determination of aristolochic acid in botanicals and dietary supplements by liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection and by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry: single laboratory validation confirmation. J AOAC Int. 2006 Jul-Aug;89(4):949-959. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon] (Free full-text article available)
  12. Weaver CM, Trucksess MW. Determination of aflatoxins in botanical roots by a modification of AOAC Official Method℠ 991.31: single-laboratory validation. J AOAC Int. 2010 Jan-Feb;93(1):184-9. PMID: 20334179 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
  13. Zhou JZ, Waszkuc T, Mohammed F. Single laboratory validation of a method for determination of glucosamine in raw materials and dietary supplements containing glucosamine sulfate and/or glucosamine hydrochloride by high-performance liquid chromatography with FMOC-Su derivatization. J AOAC Int. 2004 Sep-Oct;87(5):1083-1092. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon] (Free full-text article available)

Collaborative Study Validation Methods (alphabetical by analyte and source)

NOTE: * = Approved as Official Methods of AnalysisSM

  • Alkaloids
    • Aconitum alkaloids in supplements and raw materials by LC-UV and LC/MS [Ref 17]
    • Ephedrine alkaloids in human urine and plasma by LC/MSMS (* 2003 10) [Ref 16]
    • Ephedra alkaloids in urine and plasma by HPLC-UV [Ref 7]
    • Ephedrine alkaloids in supplements and botanicals by LC/MSMS [Ref 15]
    • Ephedrine alkaloids in botanicals and supplements by HPLC-UV (*2003 13) [Ref 8]
    • Hydrastine and berberine in goldenseal raw materials, extract and supplements by HPLC-UV (*2008 04) [Ref 1]
  • Aristolochic acid
    • Aristolochic acid in botanicals and supplements by LC-UV and LC/MS (*2007 05) [Ref 11]
  • Carotenoids
    • β-Carotene in supplements and raw materials by HPLC (*2005 07) [Ref 13]
    • Lycopene in supplements and raw materials by HPLC [Ref 3]
  • Chondroitin sulfate
    • Chondroitin sulfate in raw materials and supplements by HPLC-UV [Ref 5]
  • Coenzyme Q10
    • Coenzyme Q10 in raw materials and supplements by HPLC-UV [Ref 6]
  • Dimethylsulfoxide
    • Dimethylsulfoxide in MSM raw materials by GC-FID [Ref 9]
  • Ephedra (Ephedra sinica)
    • Ephedrine alkaloids in human urine and plasma by LC/MSMS (* 2003 10) [Ref 16]
    • Ephedra alkaloids in urine and plasma by HPLC-UV [Ref 7]
    • Ephedrine alkaloids in supplements and botanicals by LC/MSMS [Ref 15]
    • Ephedrine alkaloids in botanicals and supplements by HPLC-UV (* 2003 13) [Ref 8]
  • Flavonol aglycones
    • Flavonol aglycones in Ginkgo biloba in crude materials and finished products by HPLC (*2006 07) [Ref 4]
  • Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba)
    • Flavonol aglycones in Ginkgo biloba in crude materials and finished products by HPLC (*2006 07) [Ref 4]
  • Ginger (Zingiber officinale)
    • Aflatoxins and ochratoxin A in ginseng and ginger by IA and LC (*2008 02) [Ref 14]
  • Ginseng (Panax)
    • Aflatoxins and ochratoxin A in ginseng and ginger by IA and LC (*2008 02) [Ref 14]
  • Glucosamine
    • Glucosamine in raw materials and supplements by HPLC (*2005 01) [Ref 18]
  • Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis)
    • Hydrastine and berberine in goldenseal raw materials, extract and supplements by HPLC-UV (*2008 04) [Ref 1]
  • Isoflavones
    • Soy isoflavones in supplements, supplement ingredients and soy foods by HPLC-UV (*2008 03) [Ref 2]
  • Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM)
    • Dimethylsulfoxide in MSM raw materials by GC-FID [Ref 9]
    • Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) in raw materials and supplement by GC-FID [Ref 10]
  • Mycotoxins
    • Aflatoxins and ochratoxin A in ginseng and ginger by IA and LC (*2008 02) [Ref 14]
  • Phytosterols
    • Campesterol, stigmasterol, and β-sitosterol in saw palmetto raw materials and supplements by GC (*2007 03) [Ref 12]
  • Saw palmetto (Serenoa repens)
    • Campesterol, stigmasterol, and β-sitosterol in saw palmetto raw materials and supplements by GC (*2007 03) [Ref 12]
  • Soy (Glycine max)
    • Soy isoflavones in supplements, supplement ingredients and soy foods by HPLC-UV (*2008 03) [Ref 2]

Collaborative Study Validation Publications (alphabetical by author)

  1. Brown PN, Roman MC. Determination of hydrastine and berberine in goldenseal raw materials, extracts and dietary supplements by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV: collaborative study. J AOAC Int. 2008 Jul-Aug;91(4):694-701. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon] (Free full-text article available)
  2. Collison M. Determination of total soy isoflavones in dietary supplements, supplement ingredients, and soy foods by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection: collaborative study. J AOAC Int. 2008 May-Jun;91(3):489-500. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon] (Free full-text article available)
  3. Deshpande J, Austad J, Schierle J, Waysek EH. Determination of lycopene in dietary supplements and raw materials by high-performance liquid chromatography: collaborative study. J AOAC Int. in press.
  4. Gray D, LeVanseler K, Pan M, Waysek EH. Evaluation of a method to determine flavonol aglycones in Ginkgo biloba dietary supplement crude materials and finished products by high-performance liquid chromatography: collaborative study. J AOAC Int. 2007 Jan-Feb;90(1):43-53. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon] (Free full-text article available)
  5. Ji D, Roman M. Determination of chondroitin sulfate content in raw materials and dietary supplements by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV after enzymatic hydrolysis: collaborative study. J AOAC Int. in press.
  6. Lunetta S, Roman M. Determination of coenzyme Q10 content in raw materials and dietary supplements by high-performance liquid chromatography-UV: collaborative study. J AOAC Int. 2008 Nov-Dec;91(6):702-708. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon] (Free full-text article available)
  7. Roman MC. Determination of ephedra alkaloids in urine and plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV: collaborative study. J AOAC Int. 2004 Jan-Feb;87(1):15-24. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon] (Free full-text article available)
  8. Roman MC. Determination of ephedrine alkaloids in botanicals and dietary supplements by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV: collaborative study. J AOAC Int. 2004 Jan-Feb;87(1):1-14. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon] (Free full-text article available)
  9. Roman M, Benjamin RL. Determination of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) in methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) raw materials by GC-FID: collaborative study. J AOAC Int. in press.
  10. Roman M, Benjamin RL. Determination of methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) content in raw materials and dietary supplements by GC-FID: collaborative study. J AOAC Int. in press.
  11. Sorenson WR, Sullivan D. Determination of aristolochic acid I in botanicals and dietary supplements potentially contaminated with aristolochic acid I using LC-UV with confirmation by LC/MS: collaborative study. J AOAC Int. 2007 Jul-Aug;90(4):925-933. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon] (Free full-text article available)
  12. Sorenson WR, Sullivan D. Determination of campesterol, stigmasterol, and beta-sitosterol in Saw Palmetto raw materials and dietary supplements by gas chromatography: collaborative study. J AOAC Int. 2007 May-Jun;90(3):670-678. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon] (Free full-text article available)
  13. Szpylka J, DeVries JW. Determination of ?-carotene in supplements and raw materials by reversed-phase high pressure liquid chromatography: collaborative study. J AOAC Int. 2005 Sept-Oct;88(5):1279-1291. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon] (Free full-text article available)
  14. Trucksess MW, Weaver CM, Oles CJ, et al. Determination of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1 and G2 and ochratoxin A in ginseng and ginger by multitoxin immunoaffinity column cleanup and liquid chromatographic quantitation: collaborative study. J AOAC Int. 2008 May-Jun;91(3):511-523. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon] (Free full-text article available)
  15. Trujillo WA, Sorenson WR. Determination of ephedrine alkaloids in dietary supplements and botanicals by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry: interlaboratory study. J AOAC Int. 2003 July-Aug;86(4):657-668. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon] (Free full-text article available)
  16. Trujillo WA, Sorenson WR. Determination of ephedrine alkaloids in human urine and plasma by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry: collaborative study. J AOAC Int. 2003 Jul-Aug;86(4):643-656. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon] (Free full-text article available)
  17. Wong SK. Determination of aconitum alkaloids in dietary supplements and raw botanical materials using LC-UV with confirmation by LC/MS: collaborative study. J AOAC Int. in press.
  18. Zhou JZQ, Waszkuc T, Mohammed F. Determination of glucosamine in raw materials and dietary supplements containing glucosamine sulfate and/or glucosamine hydrochloride by high-performance liquid chromatography with FMOC-Su derivatization: collaborative study. J AOAC Int. 2005 Jul-Aug;88(4):1048-1058. [PubMed abstractexternal link icon] (Free full-text article available)

In Progress: ODS-Supported Method Development, Optimization, Validation

The following list is of dietary supplement ingredients for which single-laboratory validation studies are currently in progress. When the method is developed, validated, or the results published, the ingredient will move to one of the other categories.

  • Green tea catechins SLV
  • Hops (Humulus lupulus) SLV