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Dietary Supplement Label Database (DSLD)

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The Dietary Supplement Label Database (DSLD) was developed by the Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). It catalogs all information printed on labels of dietary supplement products sold in the United States. The database resulted from specific recommendations to NIH from Congress in 2004 that encouraged the Office to develop, create, regularly update, maintain, and make available to government and research entities a database of all supplement labels sold in the United States. The DSLD is available at https://dsld.od.nih.gov.

The 100,000+ labels in the DSLD are sourced from products reported in national population-based surveys, and through voluntary submissions by dietary supplement manufacturers and marketers. The database includes both on market and off market products to provide a comprehensive set of labels. It is updated regularly to add new products, as well as to reflect formulation and other label changes for existing products.

Dietary Supplement product information in the DSLD includes:

  • Images of package labels
  • Name and form of ingredients
  • Amount of dietary ingredients
  • All label statements

The label information in the DSLD can be used by healthcare providers to determine the contents of the products their patients are taking. Consumers can learn more about the ingredients listed on the Supplement Facts label by clicking on ingredient names. Research scientists may use the DSLD in studies to derive nutrient intakes from supplements. Publications that cite the DSLD are listed under Publications under the Reference tab.

History

Launched in June 2013, the development of the DSLD was a collaborative effort involving input from many federal stakeholders, including: the National Library of Medicine (NLM); National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes and centers; the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA); the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA); and the Department of Defense (DOD).

Over the years, the DSLD website has been redesigned with streamlined search features and new forms of data delivery to meet the needs of App developers and data scientists as well as improved performance for users. See figure below.

DSLD timeline