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Skip Navigation LinksHome > ODS Programs and Initiatives > NIH CARBON/Botanical Research Centers Program: Prior Awards > NIH CARBON Program: Botanicals Research Center for Age Related Diseases: 2000-2010

NIH CARBON Program:
Botanicals Research Center for Age Related Diseases: 2000-2010

Results in NIHReporterexternal link disclaimer

2000-2005

Purdue-UAB Botanicals Center for Age-Related Diseases

Principal Investigator: Connie M. Weaver, Ph.D.
Institution: Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
Partners: University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL; Rutgers University, NJ; University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL

This Center organized and maintained a basic research multidisciplinary program for the study of botanicals as dietary supplements with an emphasis on polyphenols for age-related diseases. Polyphenols encompass a diverse group of chemical components widely distributed in a number of plant species that are consumed both for their nutritive value and purported medicinal properties. The speculated health-promoting effects of polyphenols are generally attributed to their antioxidant action, but other biological mechanisms may be involved and were explored. The research agenda of the Purdue Center was relevant to the leading cause of death in the United States, heart disease, and to three leading causes of diminished quality of life, osteoporosis, cognitive decline, and cataracts. The Purdue researchers collaborated closely with investigators at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), under the direction of Dr. Stephen Barnes. Research projects included: Isoflavones: Metabolism and bone health, Kudzu – Cardiovascular and cognitive function, and Singlet oxygen, polyphenols and lens proteins.

Highlighted Publications

Cai DJ, Zhao Y, Glasier J, et al. Comparative effect of soy protein, soy isoflavones, and 17beta-estradiol on bone metabolism in adult ovariectomized rats.external link disclaimer J Bone Miner Res. 2005;20(5):828-839. doi:10.1359/JBMR.041236  external link disclaimer

Deshane J, Chaves L, Sarikonda KV, et al. Proteomics analysis of rat brain protein modulations by grape seed extract.external link disclaimer J Agric Food Chem. 2004;52(26):7872-7883. doi:10.1021/jf040407dexternal link disclaimer  

Hedlund TE, Maroni PD, Ferucci PG, et al. Long-term dietary habits affect soy isoflavone metabolism and accumulation in prostatic fluid in caucasian menexternal link disclaimer. J Nutr. 2005;135(6):1400-1406. doi:10.1093/jn/135.6.1400external link disclaimer  

Patel RP, Boersma BJ, Crawford JH, et al. Antioxidant mechanisms of isoflavones in lipid systems: paradoxical effects of peroxyl radical scavengingexternal link disclaimer. Free Radic Biol Med. 2001;31(12):1570-1581. doi:10.1016/s0891-5849(01)00737-7 external link disclaimer

2005 – 2010

Botanicals Research Center for Age Related Diseases

Director: Connie M. Weaver, Ph.D.
Institution: Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
Partners: University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL

This Center organized and maintained a basic research multidisciplinary program for the study of botanicals as dietary supplements with an emphasis on polyphenols for age-related diseases. Polyphenols encompass a diverse group of chemical components widely distributed in a number of plant species that are consumed both for their nutritive value and purported medicinal properties. The speculated health-promoting effects of polyphenols are generally attributed to their antioxidant action, but other biological mechanisms may be involved and were explored. The research agenda of the Purdue Center was relevant to the leading cause of death in the United States, heart disease, and to three leading causes of diminished quality of life, osteoporosis, cognitive decline, and cataracts. The Purdue researchers collaborated closely with investigators at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), under the direction of Dr. Stephen Barnes. Research projects included: Isoflavones: Metabolism and Bone Health, Kudzu (Pueraria lobata) Polyphenols: Cardiovascular and Cognitive Function, and Polyphenol Antioxidants and Eye Health. 

Highlighted Publications

Barnes S, Prasain JK, Wang CC, Moore DR 2nd. Applications of LC-MS in the study of the uptake, distribution, metabolism and excretion of bioactive polyphenols from dietary supplementsexternal link disclaimer. Life Sci. 2006;78(18):2054-2059. doi:10.1016/j.lfs.2005.12.002 external link disclaimer 

Meezan E, Meezan EM, Jones K, Moore R, Barnes S, Prasain JK. Contrasting effects of puerarin and daidzin on glucose homeostasis in miceexternal link disclaimer. J Agric Food Chem. 2005;53(22):8760-8767. doi:10.1021/jf058105e external link disclaimer 

Prasain JK, Xu J, Kirk M, Smith Johnson M, Sfakianos J, Barnes S. Differential biliary excretion of genistein metabolites following intraduodenal and intravenous infusion of genistin in female rats.external link disclaimer J Nutr. 2006;136(12):2975-2979. doi:10.1093/jn/136.12.2975 external link disclaimer 

Weaver CM, Martin BR, Jackson GS, et al. Antiresorptive effects of phytoestrogen supplements compared with estradiol or risedronate in postmenopausal women using (41)Ca methodologyexternal link disclaimer. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2009;94(10):3798-3805. doi:10.1210/jc.2009-0332  external link disclaimer

 

 Prior CARBON Awards | NIH CARBON Program